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WW2. RUSSIAN CAVALRYMAN AND HERO OF THE SOVIET UNION – SEMYON BUDYONNY – BRONZE STATUE

$169.95

SKU: bronze-318. Category: , , , .
  • ITEM: WW2. RUSSIAN CAVALRYMAN AND HERO OF THE SOVIET UNION – SEMYON BUDYONNY – BRONZE STATUE
  • Manufacturer: Date of manufacture unknown
  • Condition: Good!
  • Size(hight): 16cm (6.2inch)
  • Weight: ~1.2 kg
  • Material: bronze

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About item

Semyon Mikhailovich Budyonny (April 25 1883 – October 26, 1973) was a Russian cavalryman, a military commander during the Russian Civil War and World War II, and a close political ally of Soviet leader Joseph Stalin.
During the Russian Civil War, Budyonny’s large cavalry force helped the Bolsheviks to victory and Budyonny himself became the subject of several popular patriotic songs. He was promoted to the rank of Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1935. He was an opponent against the pre-war development of Soviet mechanized forces. In World War II, he received the blame for many of Stalin’s military strategy errors, but he was retained in the Soviet high command because of his bravery and popularity. He was a notable horse-breeder, who declared that the tank could never replace the horse as an instrument of war. In July–September 1941, Budyonny was Commander-in-Chief of the Soviet armed forces of the Southwestern Direction (Southwestern and Southern Fronts) facing the German invasion of Ukraine. This invasion began as part of Germany’s Operation Barbarossa which was launched on June 22. Operating under strict orders from Stalin (who attempted to micromanage the war in the early stages) to not retreat under any circumstances, Budyonny’s forces were eventually surrounded during the Battle of Uman and the Battle of Kiev. The disasters which followed the encirclement cost the Soviet Union 1.5 million men killed or taken prisoner. This was one of the largest encirclements in military history. In September, Stalin made Budyonny a scapegoat, dismissing him as Commander-in-Chief, Southwestern Direction, and replacing him with Semyon Timoshenko. Budyonny was then placed in charge of the Reserve Front (September–October 1941), then made Commander-in-Chief of the troops in the North Caucasus Direction (April–May, 1942), Commander of the North Caucasus Front (May–August, 1942) and Cavalry Inspector of the Red Army (since 1943), as well as various honorific posts. Despite being scapegoated by Stalin for some of the Soviet Union’s most catastrophic World War II defeats (although acting on Stalin’s specific orders), Stalin had need for popular Civil War heroes: he continued to enjoy Stalin’s patronage and suffered no real punishment. After the war he was allowed to retire as a Hero of the Soviet Union and he died of a brain hemorrhage in 1973.

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