4817806139_09fae097e4

RUSSIAN TROOPS ON WAR IN SOUTH OSSETIA 08 – PHOTO BOOK

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Title: RUSSIAN TROOPS ON WAR IN SOUTH OSSETIA 08 – PHOTO BOOK
Copyright year: 2008
Condition: Brand new!
Publisher Name: Grad Dukhovniy
Place of Publication: Russian Federation, Saint Petersburg
Size: 69 pages
Cover: Soft cover
Shipping: Worldwide free shipping!

Keywords:
Specnaz, South Ossetia, North Ossetia, Weapon, Tanks, Guns, Helicopters, AK-47, Georgian Troops, Georgia, Tbilisi

About:
The 2008 South Ossetia War or Georgian War (The armed conflict in South Ossetia; South Ossetia war; Georgian: Russia–Georgia War), was an armed conflict in August 2008 between Georgia on one side, and Russia, South Ossetia and Abkhazia on the other. The 1991–1992 South Ossetia War between Georgians and Ossetians had left slightly more than a half of inhabited part of South Ossetia under de-facto control of a Russian-backed internationally unrecognised government. Nearly half ethnic Georgian and Ossetian -inhabited parts of South Ossetia remained under the control of Georgia (Akhalgori district, and most villages surrounding Tskhinvali). A similar situation existed in Abkhazia after the War in Abkhazia (1992–1993). The increasing tensions escalated during the summer months of 2008. On 5 August, Russia vowed to defend South Ossetia. During the night of 7 to 8 August 2008, Georgia launched a large-scale military attack against South Ossetia, in an attempt to reconquer the territory.The following day Russia reacted by deploying combat troops in South Ossetia and launching bombing raids deep into Georgia. Russian and Ossetian soldiers clashed with Georgian soldiers in the four-day Battle of Tskhinvali, the main battle of the war. On August 9, Russian naval forces blockaded a part of the Georgian coast and landed marines on the Abkhaz coast.Russian and Abkhaz forces opened a second front by attacking the Kodori Gorge, held by Georgia. and entered western parts of Georgia’s interior. After five days of heavy fighting, the Georgian forces were routed, enabling the Russians to enter uncontested Georgia and occupy the cities of Poti, Gori, Senaki, and Zugdidi. After mediation by the French presidency of the European Union, the parties reached a preliminary ceasefire agreement on 12 August, signed by Georgia on 15 August in Tbilisi and by Russia on 16 August in Moscow. On 12 August, President Medvedev had already ordered a halt to Russian military operations, but fighting did not stop immediately. After signing the ceasefire agreement, Russia pulled most of its troops out of uncontested Georgia, but established buffer zones around Abkhazia and South Ossetia and also created check-points in Georgia’s interior, (Poti, Senaki, Perevi). On 26 August 2008, Russia recognised the independence of South Ossetia and Abkhazia. Russia completed its withdrawal from uncontested Georgia on 8 October, but, as of 2009, Russian forces remain stationed in Abkhazia and South Ossetia under bilateral agreements with the corresponding governments. However, according to a number of European and US sources, Russia has not complied with the peace agreement because Georgia lost control over some of what Georgia’s government considers as its territories. A number of incidents occurred in both conflict zones in the months after the war ended. As of 2010, tensions between the belligerents remain high.

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