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In: Architecture, Moscow

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In: Red Army, Transportation

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Soviet chemical corps in 1960s’
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In: Soviet Cities

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Donetsk – (former names:Yuzovka, Staline, Stalino) is a large city in Ukrainian SSR.

In 1924, under the Soviet rule, the city’s name was changed to Stalin. In that year, the city’s population totaled 63,708, and in the next year, 80,085. In 1929-31 the city’s name was changed to Stalino.The city did not have a drinking water system until 1931, when a 55.3 km system was laid underground.
During Nikita Khrushchev’s second wave of destalinization in November 1961 the city was renamed Donetsk, after the Seversky Donets River, a tributary of the Don in order to distance it from the former leader Joseph Stalin. In 1965, the Donetsk Academy of Sciences was established as part of the Academy of Science of the Ukrainian SSR. In 1970, Donetsk was recognised by UNESCO as the cleanest industrial town of the world. Donesk was granted the Order of Lenin in 1979.
SovietEraMuseum exclusive. Donetsk in rare photos:

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Cheboksary is the capital city of the Soviet Chuvash Republic and a large port on the Volga River. Population: 419,592 (1989 Census)

Some rare photos from SovietEraMusem archive:

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Our reportage from photo exhibition “100 anniversary of Russian Air Force 1912-2012″ (Moscow, Russian Federation). Exlusive of the SovietEraMuseum:

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Ostankino Tower  is a television and radio tower in Moscow, Russia. Standing 540.1 metres (1,772 ft) tall.

The tower was the first free-standing structure to exceed 500 m (1,600 ft) in height. Ostankino was built to mark the 50th anniversary of the October Revolution. It is named after the Ostankino district of Moscow in which it is located.

Construction began in 1963 and was completed in 1967. SovietEraMuseum present a few photos from Ostankino Tower building:

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Exlusive! Only in the SovietEraMuseum. Real photos and letters from ww2 battlefront 1941-1945

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In mid-September 1954, nuclear bombing tests were performed in Totskoye range during the training exercise Snezhok(Snowball or Light Snow) with some 45,000 people, all Soviet soldiers and officers, who were exposed to radiation from a bomb twice as powerful as the one dropped on Hiroshima nine years earlier. The exercise was commanded by the Marshal of the Soviet Union, Georgy Zhukov. At 9:33 a.m. on 14 September 1954, a Soviet Tu-4 bomber dropped a 40-kilotonne (170 TJ) atomic weapon from 8,000 metres (26,000 ft). The bomb exploded 350 metres (1,150 ft) above Totskoye range, 13 kilometres (8 mi) from Totskoye.

The experiment was conceptually similar to others performed at the time by the United States, the United Kingdom and other atomic countries, and was designed to test the performance of military hardware and soldiers in the event of a nuclear war. It involved the 270th Rifle Division,320 planes, 600 tanks and 600 armored personnel carriers. The soldiers were told that there would be a regular military exercise featuring a mock nuclear explosion and that it would be filmed. The military personnel were not issued any protective gear. Deputy Defense Minister Georgy Zhukov witnessed the blast from an underground nuclear bunker. The planes were ordered to bomb the explosion site five minutes after the blast, and three hours later (after the demarcation of the radioactive zone) the armored vehicles were ordered to practice the taking of a hostile area after a nuclear attack.

The residents of selected villages (Bogdanovka and Fedorovka) that were situated around 6 km (4 mi) from the epicenter of the future explosion were offered temporary evacuation outside the 50 km (31 mi) radius. Most of the local population was never warned, however.

The SovietEraMuseum exclusive. Photos approx. from Totskoye range nuclear tests (?):

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The Soviet war in Afghanistan was a nine-year war during the Cold war fought by the Soviet Army against the Afghan Mujahideen guerrilla movement and foreign “Arab–Afghan” volunteers. The mujahideen received wide military and financial support from Pakistan also receiving direct and indirect support by the United States and China. The Afghan government fought with the intervention of the Soviet Union as its primary ally. The total irrecoverable personnel losses of the Soviet Armed Forces, frontier, and internal security troops came to 14,453. Soviet Army formations, units, and HQ elements lost 13,833, KGB sub-units lost 572, MVD formations lost 28, and other ministries and departments lost 20 men.

Photos from Afghanistan:

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