Archive for the ‘Potcards’ Category

The World Festival of Youth and Students is an international event, organized by the World Federation of Democratic Youth (WFDY), a left-wing youth organization, jointly with the International Union of Students since 1947. The largest festival was the 6th, held in 1957 in Moscow, when 34,000 young people from 131 countries attended the event. This festival also marked the international debut of

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Kharkov is the second-largest city of Soviet Ukraine. Located in the north-east of the country, it is the largest city of the Slobozhanshchyna historical region. The city was founded in 1654 and was a major centre of Ukrainian culture in the Russian Empire. Kharkiv became the first city in Ukraine to acknowledge the Soviet power in December of 1917 and becoming later

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1971: The 1971 World Ice Hockey Championships was the 38th edition of the Ice Hockey World Championships, which also doubled as the 49th European ice hockey championships. For the ninth straight year, the Soviet Union won the world championship, although Czechoslovakia won the 49th European championship as the Czech opening loss against the Americans did not count in the European standings. Team USA

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About thirty villages located southeast of Moscow produce pottery and ship it throughout Russia. The name Gzhel became associated with pottery in the 14th century. Gzhel pottery was originally created by potters in their homes, however fairly early on these potters started to organize into workshops to increase production. The workshops eventually became a factory with pieces being formed in moulds and

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Vladimir Ilyich Lenin born Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (22 April 1870 – 21 January 1924) was a Russian communist revolutionary, politician and political theorist who served as the Premier of the Soviet Union from 1922 to 1924. SovietEraMuseum exclusive. May be we have the biggest collection of Soviet postcards at the world. This is a first part. Postcards about Vladimir Lenin.

 Vera Ignatyevna Mukhina (born 1 July 1889 in Riga; died 6 October 1953 in Moscow) was a prominent Soviet sculptor. Postcards from SovietEraMuseum (exclusive):

Mamayev Kurgan is a dominant height overlooking the city of Volgograd (formerly Stalingrad) in USSR. The name in Russian means “tumulus of Mamai”. The original Mamayev Kurgan was a Tartar burial mound 102 metres high. The current formation is dominated by a memorial complex commemorating the Battle of Stalingrad (August 1942 to February 1943). The battle was a decisive Soviet victory over Axis forces on the Eastern front of World War

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During the 1950s and 1960s the USSR used a number of dogs for sub-orbital and orbital space flights to determine whether human spaceflight was feasible. In this period, the Soviet Union launched missions with passenger slots for at least 57 dogs. The actual number of dogs in space is smaller, as some dogs flew more than once. Most survived; the few that died were lost

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During the Soviet era, the Red Square maintained its significance, becoming a focal point for the new state. Besides being the official address of the Soviet government, it was renowned as a showcase for military parades from 1919 onward. Lenin’s Mausoleum would from 1924 onward be a part of the square complex, and also as the grandstand for important

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The term “Siberia” has a long history. Its meaning has gradually changed during ages. Historically, Siberia was defined as the whole part of Russia to the east of Ural Mountains, including the Russian Far East. According to this definition, Siberia extended eastward from the Ural Mountains to the Pacific coast, and southward from the Arctic Ocean to the border

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